Monday, August 22, 2005

Meeks Update

David Sirota has the latest:

Rep. Greg Meeks (D-NY) is quickly becoming an important cautionary tale about what happens when Democrats sell out their working class base. After voting for things like the Central American Free Trade Agreement and the bankruptcy bill, Meeks has been the target of much local criticism in his home district. And he hasn't taken it too well.

First, New York's powerful Working Families Party and top unions held a public rally to demand the House Democratic Leadership remove Meeks from his committee assignments. Meeks responded by having a staffer claim that the criticism of his votes were somehow "racist." Ridiculous.

Now, Meeks' hometown paper hammered him for selling out. Meeks responded by trying to stop other papers from publishing critical stories about his votes (see
one of those stories here).

Here's a little advice to Meeks and other Democrats who are consistently undermining their party and America's middle class: if you don't want to be criticized for selling out, THEN DON'T SELL OUT. It's just that simple.

But what's a little bit of thuggery to a sell-out, right?

2 comments:

Civilis said...

Good job keeping the pressure up on Meeks.

David Schweitzer said...

SPEAKING OF SELLOUT -- DON'T ENDORSE BLOOMBERG:
I read where the WFP is considering endorsing Michael Bloomberg for mayor of NYC. This man has claimed to give parents greater control of the school system while in fact he has taken it away and his overhauled school system has repeatedly ignored parents' wishes and complaints (at least until the parents in question take to the streets, which has been necessary with alarming frequency in the last few years).
This is a mayor who has done nothing to create affordable housing in Manhattan. This is a mayor whose big project last year was a (failed) football stadium in midtown.
I vote WFP whenever I have the chance. If you make this endorsement, I will make sure never to vote on the WFP line again, but rather vote for the candidate on his or her main party line. I am a union leader at my job and will encourage the 85 people who come to my meetings to do the same. They dislike Bloomberg as much as I do. Of course they do. They're teachers and paraprofessionals.